Tag Archives: greece

If Ireland was Greece…in tax terms anyhow

taxleftontableIreland has a tax problem.. If we were to collect tax at Greek levels, we would take in €8b extra. Greece,…Think about that for a little while and wonder how we could spend that on investment, debt paydown, and increased social services. The chart shows how much more we could raise in taxation if we were to levy tax at the rate of our compeers.

We don’t, really, as an economy pay as much as we should for the services we want. There, I said it. In 2012 we collected 28.7% of GDP in tax. The EU average is closer to 40%. Taxing at the EU average we could have nearly €18b more pa to deploy, taxing at Danish levels nearly €32b. The next time a politician says we dont have resources to prosecute white collar crime, to treat sick children decently, show them the graph here.  Continue reading

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Where does the legal right to a 5y GREXIT exist?

The proposal by the German finance minister, and agreed to by others, that Greece take a five year break from the Eurozone is astounding. Its not so astounding that a man who has been musing on this for years has now tabled it. Schauble has as far back as 2012 been wanting this. What is astounding is that he had the gall to table it at the Eurogroup. Given that the Eurogroup is self admittedly a body with no legal basis or structures, I suppose they can do whatever they want. But when it’s a group of finance ministers musing on something ultra vires we should be concerned. And what they are doing, or proposing to do, is exactly that. Continue reading

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The Eurogroup gets Mythological on Greece

Greek myth, which is in case you missed it full of tragedies, is the cultural mine that keeps on yielding for the present crisis.

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Booms and Busts in Greek Analyses

The last week has seen a boom in one area of human endeavour, the utilisation of metaphors drawn from Greek myth to describe the present state of play in the Hellenic Republic.  That Greece has been undergoing a slow motion tragedy, now accelerating, is undoubted by (almost) all commentators.  A modern, developed, European, democratic country is devolving before our eyes into one where malaria and tuberculosis are making an unwelcome return,   a laboratory for failed economic experimentation in which the hapless citizens are the denizens of the monetary petri dish.

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In bad faith | Ashoka Mody at Bruegel.org

Pretty damning stuff. Those that smugly, glibly, heartlessly, self interestedly , and ignorantly witter and astroturf about Greece needing to do X Y and Z might want to read this. But then that might challenge the closeness of their minds.

Below the concluding paragraphs..

 

We may not like the conclusion, but it is quite simple. Greece has not grown and prices have fallen because that was to be expected when persistent austerity is laid on top of an unsustainable debt. The debt-deflation spiral always outpaces the returns from structural reforms. As certainly as these things can be predicted, on the path set out by the creditors, the stakes will continue to be escalated: the debt-to-GDP ratio will continue to rise, the calls for more austerity will grow, and, as the pattern repeats, more debt relief will needed.

So we arrive to the present. The IMF looks back at its diagnosis in November 2012 and says, the Greeks did not follow our advice; it is no surprise that they are in a mess and they need more debt relief. The truth is that the Greeks are in a mess precisely because they followed the IMF’s austerity advice and because the promised elixir of structural reforms was illusory.

And the double indignity is that the IMF now wants the Greeks to do more austerity in the midst of a debt-deflation cycle because it chooses to misread the evidence of the past years. If that advice is, in fact, followed, it is nearly certain that the Greek debt burden will be greater in two years than it is now.

We may cast a moral and political spin on these facts. Indeed, it is understandable that political considerations will play a central role in the European dialogue. But the economic logic is relentless. And the IMF’s role—its only role—is to render the economic logic transparent for informed decision making. In disregard of generations of fine IMF economists and research, the IMF has engaged in its own moral posturing to retrieve its money and hide its failures.

To be clear, the argument is not that more debt relief be promised in exchange for more austerity now. The argument is that debt relief is needed now to prevent the need for even more debt relief later. It is as much in the creditors’ interest to change course as it is in the Greek interest. Once that premise is accepted, then within that basic framework there is much that the Greeks can do to improve their lot. But such is the momentum, the politics will almost surely subordinate the economic logic. That would be a mistake. At what is surely a pivotal moment in European and global history, at least the facts must be laid out transparently.

via In bad faith | Ashoka Mody at Bruegel.org.

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Schäuble, a modern Procustes.

The Greek mess is one in which there is plenty of blame for all sides.
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Greece – GREXIT = Export Miracle …err, hang on…

So nobody knows what is going on in Greece. Tspiras seems willing, as he has done all along, to compromise. Meanwhile, Dr Schaubel, which is German for “hell, no”, seems to as willing to be as uncompromising as possible, in between lecturing the ECB

If Greece does GREXIT, which is not certain, this will result in a depreciation of the currency by up to 50% some reckon. And here is the rub. Greece is critically dependent on certain things which will get expensive, while its exports (in trade) are not that large nor perhaps that amenable to rapid rampup in the face of increased demand concomitant on falling prices, or are indeed priced in non Euro currencies anyhow. While tourism and services help, Greece runs a massive CA deficit. The logic of GREXIT is that somehow not only will debt disappear (only if they default in tandem will that happen) but that exports will boom. Well, maybe.

This whole thing has been grossly mishandled, and while the Greeks have a bunch of blame, the TROIKA must take the lions share. If they are, as Lagarde said, the “adults” then its time to start behaving like it.

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